• Dental Implants
  • Dental Implants
  • Dental Implants
  • Dental Implants
  • Dental Implants

Dental Implants

Dental implant xray Jindalee

 

 

Dental implants are used to retain artificial teeth, facial prosthetics or to act as anchor points for orthodontics.

 

 

 

Dental Implants in Jindalee and Mount Ommaney

If you are considering getting a dental Implant in Jindalee, Mount Ommaney or the surrounding areas, like Middle Park, Sinnamon Park, Brookfield, Chapel Hills, Westlake, Riverhills, Seventeen Mile Rocks and Kenmore, it’s essential you talk to the experienced team at Dentist Jindalee Brisbane. We understand the ins and outs of the procedure and can recommend the right implant for you.

Contact our team today to discuss your dental implant with Jindalee’s number one dentist. We also offer a range of other dental treatments, as well as kid focused services.

A dental implant (also known as an endosseous implant or fixture) is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull to support a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor. Most implants connect with other components in order to function. A common component is an abutment which can provide the connection to a dental prosthesis. Modern dental implants can fuse with bone through a biologic process called osseointegration. Materials such as titanium, and some ceramics form this bone integration instead of causing a foreign body reaction as found with most other materials.

Prior to the discovery of osseointegration, various non-titanium implants were placed in the jawbones (or the periosteum surrounding them) but had high complication rates due to foreign body reactions. In fact, implantable fixtures to replace teeth are not a new concept, with evidence of use at least 4000 years ago with ancient Chinese bamboo dental implants. The prerequisites to long term success of osseointegrated dental implants, are healthy bone and gingiva. Pre-prosthetic procedures sometimes are required to recreate ideal bone and gingiva to enable implant placement (particularly after atrophy from previous tooth removal). In the presence of healthy tissues, a well-integrated implant with appropriate biomechanical loads can have long term success rates of 93 to 98 percent for the fixture and 10 to 15 year lifespans for the prosthetic teeth.

General considerations
Planning for dental implants focuses on the general health condition of the patient, the local health condition of the mucous membranes and the jaws and the shape, size, and position of the bones of the jaws, adjacent and opposing teeth. There are few health conditions that absolutely preclude placing implants although there are certain conditions that can increase the risk of failure. Those with poor oral hygiene, heavy smokers and diabetics are all at greater risk for a variant of gum disease that affects implants called peri-implantitis, increasing the chance of long-term failures. Long-term steroid use, osteoporosis and other diseases that affect the bones can increase the risk of early failure of implants.

Biomechanical considerations
The long-term success of implants is determined, in part, by the forces they have to support. As implants have no periodontal ligament, there is no sensation of pressure when biting so the forces created are higher. To offset this, the location of implants must distribute forces evenly across the prosthetics they support. Concentrated forces can result in fracture of the bridgework, implant components, or loss of bone adjacent the implant. The ultimate location of implants is based on both biologic (bone type, vital structures, health) and mechanical factors. Implants placed in thicker, stronger bone like that found in the front part of the bottom jaw have lower failure rates than implants placed in lower dentisity bone, such as the back part of the upper jaw. People who grind their teeth also increase the force on implants and increase the likelihood of early and late failures. The design of implants, has to account for a lifetime of real-world use in a person’s mouth.

Regulators and the dental implant industry have created a series of tests to determine the long-term mechanical reliability of implants in a person’s mouth by putting the implants in function until the point of failure. When a more exacting plan is needed beyond clinical judgment, the dentist will make an acrylic guide (called a stent) prior to surgery which guides optimal positioning of the implant. Increasingly, dentists opt to get a CT scan of the jaws and any existing dentures, then plan the surgery on CAD/CAM software. The stent can then be made using stereolithography following computerized planning of a case from the CT scan. The use of CT scanning in complex cases also helps the surgeon identify and avoid vital structures such as the inferior alveolar nerve and the sinus.

CT CADCAM Implant Placement.

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Dental Implant Stent Mount Ommaney
Dental setup for implant.
Setup for Dental Implants
A Dental Implant Stent